Piano Technique and Interpretation with Prodromos Symeonidis

Prodromos Symeonidis

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Improve your Piano Techniques and Interpretation with Prodromos Symeonidis, a outstanding German pianist.

Piano Technique and Interpretation with Prodromos Symeonidis

This course has been made to improve your piano techniques and interpretation about major classical pieces. You will study pieces by Debussy, Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, Mozart, Bach etc…

Prodromos Symeonidis is an exceptionally gifted pianist. Possessing a fine technique and a rare sense of imagination, his playing is full of colour, spirit and feeling. His playing has often aroused enthusiasm and praise among great personalities and critics for his sophisticated technique.

LESSON PRESENTATION - Prodromos Symeonidis

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The main concepts taught

Precision

Expressivity

Classical Pieces

Interpretation

Program proposed by Prodromos Symeonidis

Prodromos Symeonidis plays the proposed pieces with assurance, a sense of phrasing that brings out the musical contrasts well, and a poetic bearing. In this course you will work on your piano techniques and your way of interpretation.

ChapterDetailed Notions

Peter Tchaikovsky

“Morning Prayer”

“The Sick Doll”

“The Doll’s Burial”

Ludwig van Beethoven

“Sonatina in F major”

“Sonatina in G major”

Moderato

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

“Sonatina in C major”

Robert Schumann

No.1 “Melodie”

No.5 “Little Piece” (“Stuckchen”)

No.8 “Wild Horseman” (“Wilder Reiter”)

No.16 “First Loss” (“Erster Verlust”)

No.18 “Reaper’s Song”

No.22 “Rondo”

No.23 “Horseman” (“Reiterstuck”)

No.26 “Faschingsschwank aus Wien”

No.35 “Mignon”

Sergei Prokofiev

No.3 “Fairy Tale”

No.4 “Tarantella”

No.6 “Waltz”

No.10 “March”

Felix  Mendelssohn

Op.19 No.1 “Sweet memories”

Op.30 No.6 “Venetian Boot Song No.1”

No.14 “Lost Happiness”

No.18 of Op.38 No.6 “Duet”

No.45 “Tarantella”

Johann Sebastian Bach

“No.8 in F major” inventions

“No.15 in B minor” inventions

“No.4” Sinfonias

Béla Bartók

No.51 of the extended of the big cycle of Bela Bartok’s Mikrokosmos

No.61 of Second volume

No.69 “Study” of third volume

No.82

No.15 allegro moderato “Album for children”

Claude Debussy

No.1 “Delphi”

No.8 “A girl with a flaxen hair” (“La fille aux cheveux de lin”)

No.11 “The dance of Puck” (“La danse de Puck”)

No.5 “Heather” (“Bruyères”)

No.8 “Ondine”

Dimitri Shostakovich

No.3 “Romance”: the third piece of the album of Shotstakovich “the dance of the dolls”

No.7 “Dance”

ChapterDetailed Notions

Peter Tchaikovsky

“Morning Prayer”

“The Sick Doll”

“The Doll’s Burial”

Ludwig van Beethoven

“Sonatina in F major”

“Sonatina in G major”

Moderato

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

“Sonatina in C major”

Robert Schumann

No.1 “Melodie”

No.5 “Little Piece” (“Stuckchen”)

No.8 “Wild Horseman” (“Wilder Reiter”)

No.16 “First Loss” (“Erster Verlust”)

No.18 “Reaper’s Song”

No.22 “Rondo”

No.23 “Horseman” (“Reiterstuck”)

No.26 “Faschingsschwank aus Wien”

No.35 “Mignon”

Sergei Prokofiev

No.3 “Fairy Tale”

No.4 “Tarantella”

No.6 “Waltz”

No.10 “March”

Felix  Mendelssohn

Op.19 No.1 “Sweet memories”

Op.30 No.6 “Venetian Boot Song No.1”

No.14 “Lost Happiness”

No.18 of Op.38 No.6 “Duet”

No.45 “Tarantella”

Johann Sebastian Bach

“No.8 in F major” inventions

“No.15 in B minor” inventions

“No.4” Sinfonias

Béla Bartók

No.51 of the extended of the big cycle of Bela Bartok’s Mikrokosmos

No.61 of Second volume

No.69 “Study” of third volume

No.82

No.15 allegro moderato “Album for children”

Claude Debussy

No.1 “Delphi”

No.8 “A girl with a flaxen hair” (“La fille aux cheveux de lin”)

No.11 “The dance of Puck” (“La danse de Puck”)

No.5 “Heather” (“Bruyères”)

No.8 “Ondine”

Dimitri Shostakovich

No.3 “Romance”: the third piece of the album of Shotstakovich “the dance of the dolls”

No.7 “Dance”

A word from our teachers

Prodromos Symeonidis attaches itself, in all its performance, to an impeccable respect of the text without its objectivity and precision in any way refuting the musicality of the whole. Playing by heart, he proves to be more tense, more orchestral, more inventive, and more lyrical.