Classical Piano Masterclass: 9 Great Classical Pieces

Antonio Pompa Baldi

Expert

27 videos

Discover the piano masterclass given by the talented Antonio Pompa-Baldi and study 9 famous classical pieces composed by Beethoven, Mozart, Liszt, Chopin, etc.

Classical Piano Masterclass: 9 Great Classical Pieces

Antonio Pompa-Baldi is an Italian pianist who won the first price of Cleveland International Piano Competition in 1999. He currently teaches piano at the prestigious Cleveland Institute of Music.

In this piano masterclass, Antonio invites you to work on a selection of 9 classical pieces composed by Debussy, Mozart, Beethoven, Carl, Liszt, Grieg, Rachmaninov and Chopin. He will focus on their interpretation and the different techniques used in each piece.

LESSON PRESENTATION - Antonio Pompa Baldi

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The main concepts taught

Flow and Balance

Allegro

Lyrical and Polyphonic Aspect

Horizontal Melody

The program proposed by Antonio Pompa-Baldi

This masterclass intended for advanced pianists, is divided into 8 parts, each part corresponding to one composer. Your professor Antonio will focus on the way to interpret classical pieces as well as the different techniques used.

 

ChapterDetails

“No.21 Op.53 in C major (Waldstein sonata)”

by Ludwig van Beethoven

To begin with, Antonio introduces the Waldstein sonata. He tells us about the melody variations in the different movements as well as the dynamics. Then, he performs the piece.

After that, he explains how important are injected notes and pedal marking in the performance of this piece.

“Piano Sonata in F major, K. 332”

by Mozart

 

In this 2nd session, Antonio insists on the operatic (lyric) quality of the music. He also deals with the psychological inflection, polyphony, relaxation and tension.

He explains how to find the right flow and the right balance between the hands.

“Ballade No. 2 in B minor”

by Franz Liszt

In this part, you will study the interpretation of a more darker theme with a reference to the tragic myth of Orpheus and Eurydis.

“Suite Bergamasque”

by Claude Debussy

Here, Antonio introduces you a baroque piano piece. You will see how the “tempo rubato” is used.

The 2nd movement of the piece is a menuet giving to it a feeling of dance. You will work on the transitions in order to avoid choppiness.

“Holberg Suite”

by Edvard Grieg

In this piece, Antonio shows you how to play a floating sound instead of a mechanical sound.

“2nd Sonata”

by Sergueï Rachmaninov

You’ll be explained the lyric and polyphonic aspect. Antonio advices to not respect the tempo of the metronome in order to give the right effect, especially at the beginning of of the piece.

Then, you will see the notions of horizontal melody and will play “scherzando” meaning playing with lightness.

“Scherzo No. 1 in B minor” & “Piano Sonata No .2”

by Chopin

Thanks to these two pieces of Mozart you will focus on the notions of “agitato” sections and “transitional” moments. You will find back the “scherzo” way to play piano, but also the “tremolato”.

“Variations on a theme by Rode Op.33”

by Czerny Carl

Finally, in this last piece of Carl, the goal is to practice your finger techniques so that you can play this piece with lightness and speed.

 

ChapterDetails

“No.21 Op.53 in C major (Waldstein sonata)”

by Ludwig van Beethoven

To begin with, Antonio introduces the Waldstein sonata. He tells us about the melody variations in the different movements as well as the dynamics. Then, he performs the piece.

After that, he explains how important are injected notes and pedal marking in the performance of this piece.

“Piano Sonata in F major, K. 332”

by Mozart

 

In this 2nd session, Antonio insists on the operatic (lyric) quality of the music. He also deals with the psychological inflection, polyphony, relaxation and tension.

He explains how to find the right flow and the right balance between the hands.

“Ballade No. 2 in B minor”

by Franz Liszt

In this part, you will study the interpretation of a more darker theme with a reference to the tragic myth of Orpheus and Eurydis.

“Suite Bergamasque”

by Claude Debussy

Here, Antonio introduces you a baroque piano piece. You will see how the “tempo rubato” is used.

The 2nd movement of the piece is a menuet giving to it a feeling of dance. You will work on the transitions in order to avoid choppiness.

“Holberg Suite”

by Edvard Grieg

In this piece, Antonio shows you how to play a floating sound instead of a mechanical sound.

“2nd Sonata”

by Sergueï Rachmaninov

You’ll be explained the lyric and polyphonic aspect. Antonio advices to not respect the tempo of the metronome in order to give the right effect, especially at the beginning of of the piece.

Then, you will see the notions of horizontal melody and will play “scherzando” meaning playing with lightness.

“Scherzo No. 1 in B minor” & “Piano Sonata No .2”

by Chopin

Thanks to these two pieces of Mozart you will focus on the notions of “agitato” sections and “transitional” moments. You will find back the “scherzo” way to play piano, but also the “tremolato”.

“Variations on a theme by Rode Op.33”

by Czerny Carl

Finally, in this last piece of Carl, the goal is to practice your finger techniques so that you can play this piece with lightness and speed.

 

A word from our teachers

“One of the things that I suggest to my students that they do, is not to push the pedal all the way down. We need to save and preserve the idea behind this pedalling, but we don’t need to push the foot completely down. This still gives us the ability to sustain this bass, not to lose it when we play this. At the same time, because of the depth of the touch of the base note, we should use finger pedal those notes. It means that even without the pedal, it sounds still like increase the effect pedal. ”